Retaining Books of Account Post Dissolution of a Corporate Debtor

Uncertainty remains as to how long the Liquidator should maintain the books of account of the corporate debtor under the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, 2016. Do they become bona vacantia? For clarity, it may be noted the Liquidation Regulations specify that the liquidator shall preserve specified registers and books of account for a period of eight years from the date of dissolution of the corporate debtor. These can be referred to as ‘books of the liquidator pertaining to liquidation’. The format of the registers and books of account has also been specified in the regulations. The regulations also mandate that the liquidator should complete the books of account of the corporate debtor if they are incomplete on the liquidation commencement date. The reference to books of account here is to ‘books of the corporate debtor prior to liquidator. In this sense, there are ‘books of the corporate debtor’ and books of the liquidator’.

The period of preservation of books of the liquidatorhas been provided in the regulations. But the Code and the regulations are silent on the period for which the books of the corporate debtorare to be preservedby the liquidator. Can they be destroyed upon order of dissolution?

The requirement of maintenance and preservation of books of account of a company is provided in the Companies Act, 2013 in following terms:

Books of Account are to be maintained for period of not less than eight financial years immediately preceding a financial year together with the vouchers relevant to any entry in such books of account. Where an investigation has been ordered in respect of the company, the Central Government may direct that the books of account may be kept for such longer period as it may deem fit (s. 128).

The company shall maintain and preserve at its registered office copies of all documents and information as originally filed for incorporation till its dissolution (s.7).

Interestingly, the Companies Act, 2013 deals with the disposal of books of account upon dissolution as under (s. 347):

  • The books and papers of a company to be dissolvedand those of the Company Liquidator to be disposed of in the manner as directed by the Tribunal.
  • After the expiry of five years from the dissolution of the company, no responsibility shall devolve on the company, the Company Liquidator, or any person to whom the custody of the books and papers has been entrusted, by reason of any book or paper not being forthcoming to any person claiming to be interested therein.
  • The Central Government may, by rules, prevent for such period the destruction of the books and papers of a company which has been wound up and of its Company Liquidator.

Under the Company (Court) Rules, 1959 [Applicable to winding-up governed by provisions of the Companies Act, 1956], the High Court, in its discretion, can pass orders directing disposal of the books and papers of the company and of the Liquidator.

Section 356 of the CA 2013 provides that the dissolution can be declared as void by the Tribunal upon an application being made within two years from the date of dissolution.

Similar provisions find no place in the Code or in the Regulations. The period for preservation for books of liquidator is provided in the Regulations but not for books of the corporate debtor. Section 347 of the Companies Act, 2013 cannot be applied for liquidation under the Code regardless of the fact that the same Tribunal has the authority to deal with winding-up under the Companies Act, 2013 as well as liquidation under the Code. In any case, corporate debtor under the Code is a broader term and also includes limited liability partnership and there is no question of extending the applicability of provisions of the Companies Act, 2013 to a LLP. Winding-up process under the Companies Act, 2013 and liquidation process under the Code are two distinct processes under two different statutes.

Typically, the regulations should be amended to provide for the period of preservation of books of the corporate debtor. Until, this is done, the onus lies on the Tribunal using its power under section 60(5) of the Code to direct the period and the manner of preservation or disposal of the books of account of the corporate debtor upon the order of dissolution.

There may be case of pending investigation and litigation against the corporate debtor. Should the books and records be maintained till the end of investigation or litigation? The answer lies in the question itself. No corporate debtor should, ordinarily, be dissolved if any investigation, litigation or case is pending against it. Dissolving such a corporate debtor would be a huge lapse giving rise to a legal crisis.

@Ashish Makhija: ashish@ashishmakhija.com

Disclaimer: The views expressed here are views based on my personal interpretation for academic purposes alone and should not be deemed as legal or professional advise on the subject. If relied upon, the author does not take any responsibility for any liability or non-compliance.

 

 

 

NCLT Knocks Out 137 Days from CIRP

NCLT Principal Bench in a recent order of NIIL Infrastructure Private Limited  directed exclusion of 137 days from CIRP period. The Bench was of the opinion that section 12(2) for extension of time as alternative prayer need not be invoked in the case. In this case, Resolution Professional (RP) was appointed by the Bench after a gap of 114 days after the tenure of Interim Resolution Professional (IRP) ended. Though the IRP organised few meetings of the committee of creditors (CoC) but no decision could be arrived at on the appointment of RP. It was only after the intervention of the Bench that CoC resolved to appoint RP. Earlier also 23 days were lost when inadvertently different IRP was appointed than the one proposed by the financial creditor. The Bench, thus, excluded 137 days from the CIRP period relying upon Quinn Logistics India Pvt Ltd judgement of the NCLAT. This order paves way for exclusion of time as an alternative to extension of time where there is delay in appointment of RP.

© Ashish Makhija: ashish@ashishmakhija.com

Disclaimer: The views expressed here are views based on my personal interpretation for academic purposes alone and should not be deemed as legal or professional advise on the subject. If relied upon, the author does not take any responsibility for any liability or non-compliance.

Fundamental Change in Insolvency Commencement Date – Ambivalent Thinking

The Insolvency and Bankruptcy Second Amendment Bill, 2018 provides for a fundamental change in the insolvency commencement date (ICD) of Corporate Insolvency Resolution Process (CIRP). Presently ICD commences on the date when the order is passed by NCLT admitting the application for CIRP under section 7, 9 or 10. ICD is a significant date in the Code and many things turn on it such as the countdown for period of CIRP begins from ICD and the moratorium takes effect from ICD amongst others. In some cases, while passing the order of admission, the Bench does not simultaneously appoint an Interim Resolution Professional. This was a source of confusion as the appointment of the IRP at a later date than admission used to allow the IRP or RP lesser time than envisaged under the Code. The Second Amendment Bill, in order to correct this situation, has proposed to commence the ICD from the date of appointment of the IRP by NCLT by adding a proviso in section 5(12).

The proposed amendment looks reasonable on paper and is probably  based on experience out of the cases under the Code so far. The Code, we all know, owes its genesis to the Vishwanathan Committee Report (Bankruptcy Law Reforms Committee Report). The Report has an incomparable sense of clarity of thought and as per the Report, the ICD plays an important role in the CIRP. 

The Report recommended commencement of moratorium from Insolvency Commencement Date. The date of passing of order of admission by the Adjudicating Authority was considered as a significant date and the moratorium also commenced from this date. Moratorium has a rational relation to CIRP in the sense that this marks the beginning of calm period. Calm period provides for no coercive action against the assets of the corporate debtor and also bars transfer or alienation of property of the corporate debtor. 

With the proposal to shift the Insolvency Commencement Date to the date of appointment of IRP by NCLT, there may be gap of few days in the date of order admitting the application and date of appointment of IRP. For this gap, no moratorium will be in effect and this may prove to be counter productive. Section 14(2) provides that supply of essential goods or services to the corporate debtor shall not be terminated or suspended or interrupted during moratorium period. During the gap between the order admitting the application for CIRP and date of appointment of IRP, this provision will not have any effect and the essential services may get disrupted which may affect the functionality and working of the corporate debtors as the news of CIRP spreads like wild fire. This does not behold good for the stakeholders of the corporate debtor. Penal sections such as section 71 will effectively lose their sting.

The solution lies in amending several provisions of the existing Code to retain the effect of the provisions of the Code. This is the beginning of more changes.

© Ashish Makhija: ashish@ashishmakhija.com

Disclaimer: The views expressed here are views based on my personal interpretation for academic purposes alone and should not be deemed as legal or professional advise on the subject. If relied upon, the author does not take any responsibility for any liability or non-compliance.

 

#IBBI – Changing Rules of the Game Midway

April 1 is traditionally a day of practical jokes or hoaxes or harmless pranks. Looks like, for IBBI, April 1 is a day of teaching some hard lessons to aspiring insolvency professionals, and insolvency professionals who have formed insolvency professional entities.

The Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India (IBBI or Board) has announced amendments in Insolvency Professionals Regulations changing the rules of the game from 1st April, 2018. The major changes relate to qualification and experience necessary for registration as an Insolvency Professional (IP), undergoing continuing professional education and requirement of minimum net worth and other conditions for an Insolvency Professional entity.

Qualifications and Experience

Prior to the amendments announced on 27th March, 2018, the registration as IP was subject to fulfilment of any of the three conditions, namely, passing of National Insolvency Examination, or passing of Limited Insolvency Examination and having 10 years of experience as a CA or CS or CMA or Advocate, or passing of Limited Insolvency Examination and having 15 years of experience in management with Bachelor’s degree.

The change brings about 3 basic conditions to be fulfilled before grant of registration as IP –

  1. Passing of Limited Insolvency Examination (LIE) within 12 months before the date of application for enrolment with IPA;
  2. Completion of pre-registration educational course from IPA after enrolment;
  3. Fulfilling any one of the following criteria:
  • successful completion of the National Insolvency Programme; or
  • successful completion of the Graduate Insolvency Programme; or
  • fifteen years’ of experience in management with Bachelor’s degree from a university established or recognised by law; or
  • ten years’ of experience as chartered accountant registered as a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, or company secretary registered as a member of the Institute of Company Secretaries of India or cost accountant registered as a member of the Institute of Cost Accountants of India, or advocate enrolled with the Bar Council.

Let’s analyse the changes:

  • The passing of LIE is now mandatory for everyone aspiring to be an IP. Earlier, passing of LIE was defacto mandatory as  National Insolvency Examination (NIE) was not notified.
  • The registration for IP is to be applied within 12 months of passing of LIE. The celebrated myth of life time validity of LIE stands shattered. If 12 months expire, LIE is to be passed again. Probably, the Board wants that aspiring IPs should remain current. But this was something which was not unthinkable at the time of original framing of Regulations.
  • Pre-registration educational course from IPA after enrolment has been made mandatory. The details of such a course are still not in public domain. Add to this the likely delays in the registration process since pre-registration course is yet to be designed.
  • Successful completion of National Insolvency Programme, or Graduate Insolvency Programme, or fifteen years’ of experience in management with Bachelor’s degree from a university established or recognised by law; or ten years’ of experience as chartered accountant registered as a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, or company secretary registered as a member of the Institute of Company Secretaries of India or cost accountant registered as a member of the Institute of Cost Accountants of India, or advocate enrolled with the Bar Council is a must.

No details are available for National Insolvency Programme, or Graduate Insolvency Programme – its duration, course curriculum, who will conduct etc. At the minimum, the Board should have been ready with details of these programs prior to introducing them through change in the Regulations.

Amendments Affect Aspirants who have passed LIE but deferred decision to Register

The change in Regulations, though prospective, affect the candidates who have passed LIE prior to 1.4.2018 but have not been granted registration. It is not clear what will be the fate of applicants whose applications are pending with Board. After 1.4.2018, in the absence of any exception in the Regulations, the Board has no power to grant registration to pending applicants unless they undergo pre-registration educational course from IPA .

Those who have not applied for registration despite having passed LIE will suffer in a similar way. This tantamount to discriminating between those who have registered and those who deferred their registration decision despite passing the LIE during the same time.

Grey area exists as to the status of those who have cleared LIE but whose applications are pending with IPAs for enrolment or with IBBI for registration or are in transit between IPAs and IBBI as on 1st April, 2018.

Some enthusiastic aspirant may challenge these amendments through a writ, and there  lies a huge chance for these amendments to be set aside for such persons. At best, the Board should have made them applicable prospectively clarifying that amended regulations will be applicable to those passing LIE on or after 1.4.2018.  This can still be done.

Continuous Professional Education

The Board has introduced a concept of undergoing continuing professional education, as may be required by the Board. The purpose of Regulations is to bring about clarity. Instead, through the amendments, the Board has retained power to notify requirement of continuing professional education. Perhaps, some guidelines can be expected for the number of hours and type of education. Introduction of continuing professional education is, however, a progressive step.

Change in Requirements of IPE

The change in IPE requirements are likely to hit hard the existing IPEs.

  • The IPEs cannot have any other business objective except provide support services to insolvency professionals, who are its partners or directors. Effectively this means that IPEs cannot render service to any other person except its own insolvency professionals.
  • The minimum net worth requirement of Rs. one crore is a regressive step as it is opposite to its objective of capacity building. Why the Board wants only moneyed IPEs to function? Why it was not thought of while notifying the Regulations originally? The criteria of minimum net worth has no relation to existence of IPE. These are service oriented entities and having a minimum paid-up capital has no rational relation to the objective sought to be achieved. The focus should be on intellect and knowledge rather than on paid-up capital. It is permitted to form a company without any requirement of paid-up capital but not IPE.
  • The requirement of majority of its shares or capital contribution to be held by insolvency professionals, who are its directors or partners also fails to satisfy the test of rationality.
  • The restriction that none of the partner or director of an IPE should be a partner or a director of another IPE is also beyond any comprehension.
  • As of 28th March, 2018, 76 IPEs[1] have been recognised by the Board. All such IPEs have been given time till 30th June, 2018 and 30th September, 2018 for fulfilling the criteria. Many are likely to exist IPE business, if that what IBBI wants.

The smaller IPEs with one or two partners or directors will be hit hard by these sudden changes by the Board. The amendments encourage concentration of work in few hands rather than individual insolvency professionals who have been lured by the glitter of opportunity offered by this newest profession. Instead of encouraging the professionals to come forward and join the bandwagon, the stricter Regulatory requirements have done exactly the opposite.

Dear IBBI, shifting goal post midway is never a good idea.

© Ashish Makhija: ashish@ashishmakhija.com

Disclaimer: The views expressed here are views based on my personal interpretation for academic purposes alone and should not be deemed as legal or professional advise on the subject. If relied upon, the author does not take any responsibility for any liability or non-compliance.

[1] Source: http://ibbi.gov.in/insolvency-professional-entities.html